Posts tagged network

Samurai Web Testing Framework – Web Application Security LiveCD

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Most penetration tests are focused on either network attacks or web application attacks. Given this separation, many pen testers themselves have understandably followed suit, specializing in one type of test or the other. While such specialization is a sign of a vibrant, healthy penetration testing industry, tests focused on only one of these aspects of a target environment often miss the real business risks of vulnerabilities discovered and exploited by determined and skilled attackers. By combining web app attacks such as SQL injection, Cross-Site Scripting, and Remote File Includes with network attacks such as port scanning, service compromise, and client-side exploitation, the bad guys are significantly more lethal. Penetration testers and the enterprises who use their services need to understand these blended attacks and how to measure whether they are vulnerable to them. This session provides practical examples of penetration tests that combine such attack vectors, and real-world advice for conducting such tests against your own organization.

The Samurai project team is happy to announce the release of a development version of the Samurai Web Testing Framework. This release is currently a fully functional linux environment that has a number of the tools pre-installed. Our hope is that people who are interested in making this the best live CD for web testing will provide feedback for what they would like to see included on the CD.

The Samurai Web Testing Framework is a live linux environment that has been pre-configured to function as a web pen-testing environment. The CD contains the best of the open source and free tools that focus on testing and attacking websites. In developing this environment, we have based our tool selection on the tools we use in our security practice. We have included the tools used in all four steps of a web pen-test.

Starting with reconnaissance, we have included tools such as the Fierce domain scanner and Maltego. For mapping, we have included tools such WebScarab and ratproxy. We then chose tools for discovery. These would include w3af and burp. For exploitation, the final stage, we included BeEF, AJAXShell and much more. This CD also includes a pre-configured wiki, set up to be the central information store during your pen-test.

dani_wafaul_falah
http://wafa.web.id

read more here

or download here

Vista, Routing and NAT. Is that Possible?

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today, i found something interesting in Vista Networking. when i used Windows XP Professional i found networking tools called netsh with a lot of functional to configure WinXP as a router (you can make your winbox as tough as *nix). Vista come with its netsh tools but limited to firewall & security, it hasn’t routing facility, but with some trick you’ll get routing capability like on WinXP.

this is the info for the netsh command
Vista
C:\Users\User>netsh show helper
Helper GUID DLL Filename Command
————————————– ———— ——-
{02BC1F81-D927-4EC5-8CBC-8DD65E3E38E8} AUTHFWCFG.DLL advfirewall
{FB10CBCA-5430-46CE-B732-079B4E23BE24} AUTHFWCFG.DLL consec
{35342B49-83B4-4FCC-A90D-278533D5BEA2} AUTHFWCFG.DLL firewall
{4D0FEFCB-8C3E-4CDE-B39B-325933727297} AUTHFWCFG.DLL monitor
{00770721-44EA-11D5-93BA-00B0D022DD1F} HNETMON.DLL bridge
{6DC31EC5-3583-4901-9E28-37C28113656A} DHCPCMONITOR.DLL dhcpclient
{8B3A0D7F-1F30-4402-B753-C4B2C7607C97} FWCFG.DLL firewall
{44F3288B-DBFF-4B31-A86E-633F50D706B3} NSHHTTP.DLL http
{0705ECA1-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IFMON.DLL interface
{1C151866-F35B-4780-8CD2-E1924E9F03E1} NETIOHLP.DLL 6to4
{725588AC-7A11-4220-A121-C92C915E8B73} NETIOHLP.DLL ipv4
{500F32FD-7064-476B-8FD6-2171EA46428F} NETIOHLP.DLL ipv6
{90E1CBE1-01D9-4174-BB4D-EB97F3F6150D} NETIOHLP.DLL 6to4
{90E1CBE1-01D9-4174-BB4D-EB97F3F6150D} NETIOHLP.DLL isatap
{1C151866-F35B-4780-8CD2-E1924E9F03E1} NETIOHLP.DLL isatap
{1C151866-F35B-4780-8CD2-E1924E9F03E1} NETIOHLP.DLL portproxy
{78197B47-2BEF-49CA-ACEB-D8816371BAA8} NETIOHLP.DLL tcp
{1C151866-F35B-4780-8CD2-E1924E9F03E1} NETIOHLP.DLL teredo
{F7E0BC27-BA6E-4145-A123-012F1922F3F1} NSHIPSEC.DLL ipsec
{F7E0BC29-BA6E-4145-A123-012F1922F3F1} NSHIPSEC.DLL dynamic
{F7E0BC28-BA6E-4145-A123-012F1922F3F1} NSHIPSEC.DLL static
{1D8240C7-48B9-47CC-9E40-4F7A0A390E71} DOT3CFG.DLL lan
{00B399EA-447F-4B19-8393-F9D71D7760F9} NAPMONTR.DLL nap
{3F8A1180-FF5D-4B5B-934C-D08DFFBC9CBC} NAPMONTR.DLL client
{B123BAAA-79E9-49FD-AB2C-E87C56CE4CFF} NAPMONTR.DLL hra
{931852E2-597D-40B9-B927-55FFC81A6104} NETIOHLP.DLL netio
{B7BE4347-E851-4EEC-BC65-B0C0E87B86E3} P2PNETSH.DLL p2p
{9E0D63D7-4644-476B-9DAC-D62F96E08376} P2PNETSH.DLL collab
{6ED05238-F6A3-F801-967A-5CAD6F6CAC56} P2PNETSH.DLL contact
{E35A9D1F-61E8-4CF5-A46C-0F715A9303B8} P2PNETSH.DLL group
{9AA625FC-7E31-4679-B5B5-DFC67A3510AB} P2PNETSH.DLL database
{FBFC037E-D455-4B8D-80A5-B379002DBCAD} P2PNETSH.DLL idmgr
{9E0D63D6-4644-476B-9DAC-D64F96E01376} P2PNETSH.DLL pnrp
{1DD4935A-E587-4D16-AE27-14E40385AB12} P2PNETSH.DLL cloud
{AD1D76C9-434B-48E0-9D2C-31FA93D9635A} P2PNETSH.DLL diagnostics
{6EC05238-F6A3-4801-967A-5C9D6F6CAC50} P2PNETSH.DLL peer
{0705ECA2-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} RASMONTR.DLL ras
{42E3CC21-098C-11D3-8C4D-00104BCA495B} RASMONTR.DLL aaaa
{90FE6CFC-B6A2-463B-AA12-25E615EC3C66} RASMONTR.DLL diagnostics
{13D12A78-D0FB-11D2-9B76-00104BCA495B} RASMONTR.DLL ip
{36B3EF76-94C1-460F-BD6F-DF0178D90EAC} RASMONTR.DLL ipv6
{592852F7-5F6F-470B-9097-C5D33B612975} RPCNSH.DLL rpc
{C07E293F-9531-4426-8E5C-D7EBBA50F693} RPCNSH.DLL filter
{0BFDC146-56A3-4311-A7D5-7D9953F8326E} WHHELPER.DLL winhttp
{B2C0EEF4-CCE5-4F55-934E-ABF60F3DCF56} WSHELPER.DLL winsock
{D424E730-1DB7-4287-8C9B-0774F5AD0576} WLANCFG.DLL wlan

2003
{65EC23C0-D1B9-11D2-89E4-006008B0E5B9} IPMONTR.DLL routing
{0705ECA0-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPMONTR.DLL ip
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL autodhcp
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL dnsproxy
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL igmp
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL nat
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL ospf
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL relay
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL rip
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL routerdiscovery

xp
{65EC23C0-D1B9-11D2-89E4-006008B0E5B9} IPMONTR.DLL routing
{0705ECA0-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPMONTR.DLL ip
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL autodhcp
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL dnsproxy
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL igmp
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL nat
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL ospf
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL relay
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL rip
{0705ECA3-7AAC-11D2-89DC-006008B0E5B9} IPPROMON.DLL routerdisco

from above, we found that routing capability has removed in vista, but we can take it back, here the tricks :

I got IPMONTR.DLL IPPROMON.DLL from 2003 , it is ok if you got these files from XP.
copy to Vista WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
and run

netsh add helper ipmontr.dll
netsh add helper ippromon.dll

now you can configure Vista routing and remote access.

netsh>routing ip nat
netsh routing ip nat>add interface “Nvidia” full
netsh routing ip nat>add interface “SMC” private

netsh>interf ipv4
netsh interface ipv4>set interface “8″ forwarding=enable
netsh interface ipv4>set interface “10″ forwarding=enable

8 and 10 are interface id of Nvidia and SMC.
You can get interface id by

netsh>interface ipv4 show interfa

now you can do everything with this routing capability, u can look at windows XP netsh help documentation..

best regards,
dani_wafaul_falah
http://wafa.web.id

10 Things you should know about NetSH

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NETSH is one of the most powerful tools in the Windows networking toolkit. This list will introduce you to some good uses of NETSH in various scenarios and show you how you can streamline your networking configuration, administration, and documentation.

#1: What is NETSH?

NETSH is one of the most powerful yet least known networking tools included with Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003. It’s installed by default and is located in the %systemroot%\system32 folder. NETSH is also available on Windows XP.

NETSH enables you to display, modify, import, and export many aspects of the network parameters of a system. It can also connect remotely to other systems with a remote machine parameter (-r).

#2: Contexts for NETSH

Contexts are specific dimensions of the network configuration that can be managed by NETSH. The commands and options within NETSH are context sensitive, and the same command may exist in multiple context areas but have different commands and results in each context. Here are the Windows Server 2003 NETSH context areas:

Context – Description
aaaa -Authentication, authorisation, accounting and auditing
dhcp – DHCP server administration
diag – OS and network service parametres
interface – NIC configuration; includes subcontexts
ipsec – Alternative to IP service parameters
netsh bridge – Network bridging configuration
ras – Remote access server configuration
routing – Routing administration (instead of RRAS)
rpc – subnet and interface settings
wins – Windows Internet Name Service administration

Now, to add to the confusion, a context can have a subcontext. For example, the interface context has three subcontexts, ip, ipv6, and portproxy. NETSH refers to these subcontexts as a context, such as the netsh interface ip context. Note that Windows XP has a different set of contexts. When using the import and export operations in noninteractive mode, you must specify context or subcontext configuration.

#3: Coordinating network change control with NETSH

You can use NETSH to export and import network configurations. A good example of using NETSH with networking change control would be when a system is going to be placed on a different network, but the communication channels need to be maintained to various other systems. A NETSH export will allow all parties to agree on various network settings. For example, here is a portion of a NETSH export of the interface context from a dump operation.

set address name = “Teamed NIC” source = static addr = 10.64.32.100 mask = 255.255.252.0
set address name = “Teamed NIC” gateway = 10.25.44.1 gwmetric = 1
set dns name = “Teamed NIC” source = static addr = 10.64.22.50
add dns name = “Teamed NIC” addr = 10.95.61.22
add dns name = “Teamed NIC” addr = 10.95.45.34
set wins name = “Teamed NIC” source = static addr = 10.95.45.70
add wins name = “Teamed NIC” addr = 10.95.45.25

Reviewing a NETSH export with all parties involved can ensure that the system will be routed correctly, using the correct DNS, WINS, and subnet mask. The best part is that you can then import the entire file into the Windows system after all appropriate entries have been made without any chance of entering the information incorrectly. And this is only for the interface context. The same applies for all other context scripts.

#4: Using NETSH to dynamically change TCP/IP addresses

You can use NETSH to make dynamic IP address changes from a static IP address to DHCP simply by importing a file. NETSH can also bring in the entire Layer-3 configuration (TCP/IP Address, DNS settings, WINS settings, IP aliases, etc.). This can be handy when you’re working on networks without DHCP and have a mobile computer that connects to multiple networks, some of which have DHCP. NETSH shortcuts will far exceed the capabilities of using Windows Automatic Public IP Addressing. Here is an example of running a dynamic update of an IP address:

C:\NETSH -f filename.netsh

In this example, filename.netsh is the NETSH file that contains an interface dump configuration. You can make shortcuts in Windows to a .BAT file that will run that command so you can easily add shortcuts to get a DHCP address and switch to a static IP address for a customer site, DMZ network, or any other static IP network.

#5: Best practice: Using a .NETSH extension

NETSH import and export operations are in a native plain text format and can be read and edited from any text tool. However, NETSH files should be handled as a special file type because they’re used to document network configurations, as well as for the import and export process. A best practice would be to make all export operations refer to a FILE.NETSH, where this file is what has been exported from NETSH. This is especially important because a NETSH export file doesn’t contain the word NETSH in it. This way, even a novice can figure out what the file contains.

The file extension from export (dump) and import (-f) operations are entirely user specified. For convenience, you can associate the .NETSH extension with your Windows installation to allow native double-click editing.

#6: NETSH in interactive mode

NETSH is one of the Windows tools that can be run in either an interactive or a noninteractive environment. Interactive tools (such as nslookup and dnscmd) have effectively different usage scenarios depending on the mode chosen.

Interactive mode also has two submodes, online and offline. Online mode is a direct interaction with the networking components while in interactive mode. Offline mode lets you interactively make changes and then roll them all online instantly by going to online mode.

#7: NETSH in noninteractive mode

In noninteractive mode, you can implement NETSH commands by importing a file. Using noninteractive mode is recommended for file import and export operations. With NETSH in noninteractive mode, you can export key settings from each context as a specific aspect of your system documentation. In addition, if an issue arises and you can trace it back to a specific networking topic for which you have a NETSH script exported from a known working time, you can re-import that NETSH script in noninteractive mode and restore your networking functionality to that point. Please note that NETSH does not back up data within the contexts, such as the WINS database.

#8: Clarifying the scripts

When exchanging NETSH scripts, you can insert comments to solicit feedback. This will allow you to explain an entry or use it as a training tool for others. Simply insert REM in a NETSH exported file to add a comment. Don’t put in too many comments, however; just what is necessary.

#9: NETSH precautions

NETSH is a powerful tool and should be used with caution. Using interactive online mode (the default) for changes on the fly can be more risky than implementing a change in interactive offline mode and going online to commit the changes. However, using noninteractive mode to perform changes is popular as well because the changes can be scripted. Try your hand at NETSH on a virtual machine or test system first.

#10: Navigating NETSH

The large array of features available in NETSH may seem overwhelming at first. It’s helpful to get into NETSH to see the options available and practice using the interface in interactive mode (a little different for those of us used to noninteractive tools). Getting into NETSH in interactive mode is easy: Simply type NETSH at the command prompt. Then, use these guidelines to investigate the command options:

|> To change to another context, type the name of the context. For example, typing interface ip will go immediately to the interface ip context from which ever context you are presently located.
|> To change your mode, type offline or online. Typing offline will send the interactive session offline, so any changes won’t be brought in immediately. Typing online will bring the interactive session online, so changes will immediately be brought into the networking elements of the system.
|> Typing show mode will display the current mode (offline or online). The default mode is online, so be sure to immediately jump offline if you are experimenting.
|> Typing ? or help will show the available commands for your current context location. If you’re in the root of the tool, there is no active context and your interface to the tool will be a netsh> prompt.
|> Global commands, such as online and quit, are those you can use everywhere. Context commands are available only in the current context. For example, from the netsh interface ip> context, you can view the network configuration by running show dns, but this command may not work other contexts or subcontexts.
|> In contexts, running set and show will provide the context-sensitive command options.

Cain & Abel, The Perfect Tools for Windows User

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install and collect the data, password or acting like from another computer

from http://sectools.org, this tool has increase popularity rank from 23 to 9.
with this tools you can do anything, from sniffing the network, cracking local password and the most thing that this tools can combine that, sniffing password from the network and crack it.

when you in a local area network which use a hub as switch, you will do almost all the tools ability. because the sniffing can be done from switch hub environment or from cable tap.

with the support of airpcap hardware and its driver you can gain access to the wireless network, from packet injection to cracking the wireless encryption.

sectools write this comment to this tools

#9
Cain and Abel : The top password recovery tool for Windows

UNIX users often smugly assert that the best free security tools
support their platform first, and Windows ports are often an
afterthought. They are usually right, but Cain & Abel is a glaring
exception. This Windows-only password recovery tool handles an enormous
variety of tasks. It can recover passwords by sniffing the network,
cracking encrypted passwords using Dictionary, Brute-Force and
Cryptanalysis attacks, recording VoIP conversations, decoding scrambled
passwords, revealing password boxes, uncovering cached passwords and
analyzing routing protocols. It is also well documented.

from its original site, it ha released the new version which has several feature and fixes Cain & Abel v4.9.8 released

New features:

– Added support for new AES-128bit Keyfobs in RSA SecurID Token Calculator.

– Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Password Extractor via ODBC.

– Fixed a bug in Internet Explorer 7 AutoComplete password decoder.

– Default HTTP users and passwords fields updated.

– Automatic recognition of AirPcap TX capability based on channels.

from the site, they describe this tool like this:

Cain & Abel is a password recovery tool for
Microsoft Operating Systems. It allows easy recovery of various kind of
passwords by sniffing the network, cracking encrypted passwords using
Dictionary, Brute-Force and Cryptanalysis attacks, recording VoIP
conversations, decoding scrambled passwords, recovering wireless
network keys, revealing password boxes, uncovering cached passwords and
analyzing routing protocols. The program does not exploit any software
vulnerabilities or bugs that could not be fixed with little effort. It
covers some security aspects/weakness present in protocol’s standards,
authentication methods and caching mechanisms; its main purpose is the
simplified recovery of passwords and credentials from various sources,
however it also ships some “non standard” utilities for Microsoft
Windows users.
Cain & Abel has been developed in the hope that it will be useful for
network administrators, teachers, security consultants/professionals, forensic
staff, security software vendors, professional penetration tester and everyone
else that plans to use it for ethical reasons. The author will not help or support
any illegal activity done with this program. Be warned that there is the possibility
that you will cause damages and/or loss of data using this software and that
in no events shall the author be liable for such damages or loss of data. Please
carefully read the License Agreement included in the program before using
it.
The latest version is faster and contains a lot of new features
like APR (Arp Poison Routing) which enables sniffing on switched LANs and Man-in-the-Middle
attacks. The sniffer in this version can also analyze encrypted
protocols such as SSH-1 and HTTPS, and contains filters to capture credentials
from a wide range of authentication mechanisms. The new version also ships routing protocols authentication
monitors and routes extractors, dictionary and brute-force crackers for all common hashing algorithms and
for several specific authentications, password/hash calculators, cryptanalysis
attacks, password decoders and  some not so common utilities related to
network and system security.

for completed documentation you can read the documentation area here

__original site http://www.oxid.it

and you can download it from : http://www.oxid.it/cain.html

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